de_DEus

Find out more…

This section is for those who do not know much about YWAM yet. If you are familiar with terms like DTS (Discipleship Training School) and UofN (University of the Na

tions), you may want to skip this page.

Youth With A Mission (YWAM)

Logo

Jugend mit einer Mission (JMEM) is the German branch of the international and non-denominational missionary movement Youth With A Mission. Our goal is to reach people in all the world with the gospel of Jesus Christ, according to the great commission in Mark 16:15, “Go into all the world and proclaim the good news to the whole creation.” This is accomplished through evangelism, training and mercy ministry. Worldwide there are more than 550 YWAM bases with over 13,000 full-time staff in about 130 nations.

This technically correct description may sound a bit dry, but the reality behind it is everything but boring. YWAM is a family of ministries with widely diverse projects working in many different fields and settings, from modern urban centers to the most remote and “uttermost parts of the earth”. It all began in 1960 with a vision to send young people into all the world, at first on short-term outreaches. Evangelism and relief work was followed by the development of training courses, first and foremost the Discipleship Training School, to train workers for the great commission. Out of these eventually grew the University of the Nations. (see below)

If you would like to know more about YWAM, Loren Cunningham’s book, “Is That Really You, Lord?” is a good place to start. Or check out the YWAM website at www.ywam.de (for YWAM Germany) or www.ywam.org (for YWAM international).

Discipleship Training School (DTS)

According to the motto “To Know God and to Make Him Known,” the Discipleship Training School is a course in discipleship, training Christians to follow Christ in their daily life. This includes growing in your personal relationship with God, developing Christian Character and a Christian life style, getting to know God’s plan for humanity and for your own life as well, and experiencing evangelism and missions. The school consists of a three-month lecture phase and two to three months of outreach, usually abroad and in a cross-cultural setting.

The DTS is a practical training, laying a foundation for a life of discipleship. At the same time, the DTS is also the entrance into YWAM for all who want to do more than a seminar or a short-term outreach. All YWAM staff must first complete a DTS. The DTS is also a prerequisite for all further courses within the University of the Nations. Information on the DTS in Hurlach can be found here.

University of the Nations (U of N)

UofN

The University of the Nations is the international, worldwide university network associated with YWAM, with at present training locations in over 80 countries on six continents. The U of N sees itself as a multiplier for missions and trains Christians spiritually, culturally, intellectually and professionally to use their God-given gifts to communicate and demonstrate the gospel in all nations. Believing that Christians are called to be salt and light in this world, the U of N seeks to equip students to enter and impact all areas of society. There are seven faculties or colleges: Christian Ministries, Communication, Counseling and Health Care, Education, Humanities and International Studies, Performing Arts, and Science and Technology.

Every U of N education begins with a completed Discipleship Training School. For participation in a U of N course without preceding DTS, no credits are awarded. The U of N is a degree-granting institution. Various accredited colleges throughout the USA accept transfer students and credits from the U of N, but it IS NOT ACCREDITED BY ANY ACCREDITING AGENCY OR ASSOCIATION RECOGNIZED BY THE UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION.

Further information can be found in the U of N catalogue, which can be ordered at the YWAM base nearest to you. The catalogue is also available on the internet at www.uofn.edu.

 

“To know the will of God,

we need

an open Bible and an open map.”

William Carey